yui-onodera

KOMPAKT will release a new installment of the highly anticipated & longest series on the label after Total. Pop Ambient 2017 will see the light of day on November 25. It will contain some nice material from genre veterans and a great bunch of new comers. Pop Ambient curator and co-label owner Wolfgang Voigt makes an appearance as remixer, turning the track HAL from electronic-rock-gospel duo SOULSAVERS’ 2015 album ‘Kubrick’ into a voluptuous and immersive sound journey. It’s the cherry on top of a particularly fluffy cake that will prove irresistible to any connoisseur of ambient music.

For the 2017 release, the imprint welcomes Tokyo-based Pop Ambient novice Yui Onodera with his tracks ‘CROMO1’ and ‘CROMO2’, which both serve as opener: a trained musician and architectural acoustic designer by trade, Onodera embeds diverse influences from traditional sound design, film scores, contemporary composition and electro-acoustic experimentation in his work, resulting in intricate drone sculptures and sound skylines.

Any new plans for the coming months and next year?

I have been continuously collaborating with Pjusk and our EP will come out within the year. Also, I have been cooperating on a documentary film about John Cage, which is directed by Markus Heidingsfelder. I am not only composing the soundtrack but try to help in many ways. This project and especially the theme are intriguing. I like his documentary film called A Kind of Architect, in which he focused on Rem Koolhaas. The film gave me so much inspiration.

© tanzgemeinschaft

Thanks, Yui! Please find the full interview, in which he talks about the Japanese and European music scenes, the relationship between music and architecture, his influences etc. here: http://www.tanzgemeinschaft.com/interview-yui-onodera-4006

SIGNAL is proud to present “Late Checkout (Electric Forest)”, Anna K.E. and Florian Meisenberg’s first collaborative exhibition in New York City.

K.E. and Meisenberg have created a new site-specific installation deriving from their initial collaborative project “Late Checkout”, a series of videos captured in different transitional locations in NYC. The show will also serve as an intro to their future project “Electric Forest”.

“Soundless and sealed surroundings create an ideal stage for the silent choreography in-between alienated creatures.
A neutered panoramic presence of suspended ungraspable horizon
– pictures potential. An abstraction of inter-change and coeval emotions.
Undefined privacy of altering consciousness:
corresponding the Electric Forest.
In-between the timezones of now and today – in the moment of Late Checkout.”
-Anna K.E.

October 21st – November 20th, 2016

Join us for the opening reception: October 21st, 7-10pm

george_timesobituary

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/george-spencer-brown-vc8m9xvbl

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Communication is a fascinating thing – because it isn’t really a thing. Nobody has ever seen ‘a’ communication. Of course, there are books, songs, emails and posts like this, but if noone ever reads this text, it isn’t communicating anything. A poem in a drawer that nobody but the poet has ever seen isn’t communication. It has to be shared, people have to read and ‘understand’ it (“I don’t get it, but this seems to be a poem”) and then to respond to it – for instance by writing another one. Or by today’s way of approval: “I like.”

This is why I prefer the plural: communications. It takes two to communicate, the same way it takes two to tango – taali do haath se bajtihai.

Some communications make a hell of a career for themselves. They go viral. Literally, they are infectious. Older examples are the Bible. The Quran. Homer’s Odyssey. Or think of songs by Taylor Swift, films by Spielberg, poems by Faiz Ahmed Faiz, paintings by Sadequain. Or even of everyday phrases like ‘You know’, and words like ‘like’. Other forms aren’t successful at all. We can call them flops.

As a theorist, I am interested in the mechanisms of this selection. Why do some terms become popular while others don’t? Take, for instance, the word ‘Globalization’, that was used long before, but only after Theodore Levitt  mentioned it in an 1983 article, the term itself became ‘global’. Or ‘climate change’. I would have never imagined that a term as complicated as ‘deconstruction’ could become so popular, but nowadays nearly everyone claims to be a deconstructivist.

The word that Paul J. Crutzen coined in 2000 has also made a remarkable career: ‘anthropocene’. What are the reasons for this success story?

To me, the main reason is that ‘anthropecene’ is not – as it claims to be – simply and solely a geological term. It has a deeply moral dimension to it. It includes a dramatic gesture that ascribes responsibility and at the same time asks for possible charges. Not humanity, so the idea, but the West, the European civilization is in the dock.This is why some prefer to speak of the ‘Eurocene’ instead. (Personally, I’d prefer to talk about those agencies that have acquired industrial techniques developed in Europe – and those agencies can include Indians, Pakistanis, Chinese as well as Germans or ‘Britishers’.)

This, however, is not the only reason for its success. It also matches perfectly with another semantic virus – the apocalypse. As Peter Sloterdijk has shown, the term anthropocene is conclusive only in the apocalyptic logic in which the world is evaluated from its end, as a sorting method in which the wicked are separated from the good. Which explains why it has become such an important part of the end rhetoric of the intellectual elite, especially in former European colonies like Pakistan.

I’ll be the first to admit that watching the world end in a movie can be fun, just like a rollercoaster ride. While buildings and people go down in flames and disaster strikes, we comfortably sit in our chairs, munching on some popcorn. But the prophets of the apocalypse are dead serious. They don’t just tell a horror story. They mean it: “Breaking news – the end is near!” What could be the function of this warning?

The answer is simple: visions of the end bring those who proclaim it an interested audience. And in the best case: converts. If the end is near and inevitable, then there is only one salvation – to profess the faith. It must of course be the right faith. Many of those who proclaim the end do have – coincidentally, of course – exactly this product to sell.

Communication is a fascinating thing, but it won’t save our planet – nor is it interested in doing so. All it wants to do is to continue. If this planet dies, it can’t. Maybe that’s why we should try to save it – so we can go on telling each other stories about the end.

george_times

Writer Tim Bullamore is working on a longer version that will be published in The Times soon – hopefully once again using one of our photographs!

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/george-spencer-brown-z0fqx0fvf

GSB-MH

Die Zündfunk-Sendung über George Spencer-Brown ist jetzt wieder online:

http://www.br.de/radio/bayern2/sendungen/zuendfunk/kolumnen-sendungen/generator/zuendfunk-generator-29092013-gesetze-fuer-alles-gesetze-fuer-nichts-100.html

Script: “Gesetze für alles – Gesetze für nichts. Ein Anruf bei George Spencer-Brown, dem Erfinder der Laws of Form” (BR, Zündfunk Generator 29.09.2013)

mark

> Earlier this afternoon I received a telephone call from Market Lavington
> Care Home to tell me that George Spencer-Brown passed away peacefully at
> 16.05 yesterday afternoon, 25th August 2016.
>
> It was his wish to be buried at Brookwood cemetery in unconsecrated ground,
> near Charles Bradlaugh, one of his heroes. I will do what I can to ensure
> this wish is met.
>
> I will be in contact again in a few days when I have spoken further with the
> nursing home and social services.
>
> With best wishes to all,
>
> Graham

eau de cologne

 

 

no man is an island

Dear Friends

This is the second email about the EU referendum you’ve received from me since I uploaded my posters at the end of April.

We’ve now updated the posters, shifting the focus from voter registration to getting people out to vote Remain on 23rd June.

Please go to my website www.tillmans.co.uk to download both jpgs for social media and a PDF to self print posters. Please forward this mail and encourage friends to do the same. No need to hashtag me when posting.

A couple of nights ago I wrote a comment piece for Time Out London magazine and website to be published on Monday. In it I use an image that came to my mind the other day. Should a Leave vote happen next Thursday, Britain’s message to the 444 million remaining EU members will feel a bit like this:

We lived together for over 40 years in this apartment building of 28 flats. Every member having a key to their own flat and some having even an extra lock on like Britain. We lived together in peace and got used to each other’s oddities. We even got down the utility bills, like phone and air travel and many more, but now I can’t stand living with you any longer. I hate it so much that I want to move out.

Brexiters shelter the public from having to think about what a snub this would be. The EU is not a machine; it is the representation of 508 million people.

Please post the posters and messages, maybe one a day to keep Brexit away.

The xenophobic Vote Leave campaign is part of an international mood to break things. Whether it’s Trump or Johnson, these attacks on the pillars of our society all reflect the same divisive mood.

Best wishes,
Wolfgang

hellmich

CHRISTIAN HELLMICH

THE INN
09/06/16 – 29/07/16

ERÖFFNUNG DONNERSTAG, 09/06/16, 19H

TANJA POL GALERIE

LUDWIGSTRASSE 7, 80539 MÜNCHEN

T +49.89.18946486

F +49.89.18946487

INFO@TANJAPOL.COM

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